Sunday, 31 August 2008

Privacy, Trust & Convenience

Email marketing is popular from both sides of the marketing conversation - marketers love it for its vastly superior ROI and consumers have consistently indicated a preference for the channel (see the 2008 Channel Preference Survey from ExacTarget). Whilst consumers are generally enthusiastic about the channel, there remains a recognition of the inherent underlying privacy questions. Trust, is one of the keys to effective email marketing (effective in this case being driving conversion), and clear, explicit messaging around privacy can help raise trust and therefore effectiveness. If you are able to establish unquestioned trust with your consumers, they will be delighted to exchange a little data for a little more convenience... This is, after all, the basis for any relationship isn't it...

(This ability to establish trust is even more radically important in the realms of mobile and social network marketing because of the heightened personal nature of those avenues).

Saturday, 23 August 2008

Creating Channel Desire

...and building a decent list while you're at it.


The Barack Obama campaign has, rightly, been praised for its use of email, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube etc. The most recent example, the "Be first to know" ploy of having people submit either their email or cell phone number in order to be informed (before the official announcement) of the Vice Presidential candidate was classical in the sense that it created value in the direct (and interactive) communication channels. What the campaign further did was to initiate an ongoing conversation in the best way possible - saying something relevant and interesting to the other party. Perhaps the final lesson from this particular execution is the increasing connection between email and mobile marketing - both will have a place for some time to come but the roles they each play will change radically over the next two years.

Saturday, 16 August 2008

The Way That You Say It

Edward Tufte made an entire career around the importance of the graphical representation of information and statistical graphics. Jim Collins, in the seminal Good to Great, talks about the difference (for effectively managing a company) between information and information that is impossible to ignore. Clearly the issue is not only to gather meaningful data, but to present those data in a way that captures and demonstrates in the shortest time possible (the blink of an eye) the insight and richness that lies within. The objective in any attempt to capture data is to inform, in business, it is to inform action (otherwise don't collect the data). I am looking for good examples of effective representation of information that cannot be ignored. I particularly like the New York Times use of bubble graphics (bubbles are the new bars) as in the example above of where contributions to the presidential campaigns are being invested. Click here for the live, animated version...

Wednesday, 13 August 2008

Banners Get Social

Avenue A | Razorfish and Pluck Corp. have announced the introduction of a new form of digital advertising to be made available later this year. AdLife units will be standard IAB banner units with room for viewers to input their own comments and or media. The ad unit will allow the upload of text, such as a product recommendation or review, it will also, depending on the application, allow users to upload photos, video, provide opinions, or ratings.

There are considerable experimentation possibilities for marketers here depending on the sector - anything that breathes life into banners is worth considering. The two companies are currenty working with (undisclosed) beta clients before making the units generally available...

Friday, 8 August 2008

Listening, Learning & Sharing

A beautiful visualisation of the conversation prism...

Wednesday, 6 August 2008

Seek and Thou Shalt.....

So the search marketing firm formerly known as Performics goes to Publicis. To retain any kind of neutrality, Google really had no choice but to hive off this piece of the DoubleClick business did they? What Sir Martin Sorrel refers to as a frienemy would start lose the first three letters otherwise...

It appears that this is the fruit of the Google/Publicis liason announced in January of this year (an announcement that I wrongly predicted would be the most significant product of the union). Of course, considering the bidding war that was going on to get Doubleclick all kinds of interesting alliances could have been (and may yet be) unearthed...



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